Tina Hage

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Photographic series (2013/2015)

Rehearsal


>> Articles about the series below






Rehearsal (Turmsprünge/ #08)
Photographic print, 115x60cm




Rehearsal (Huckepack/ #01)
Photographic print, 36x51cm






Rehearsal (Räuberleiter/ #07)
Photographic print, 48x57cm



Rehearsal (Pony/ #06)
Photographic print, 38x51cm






Rehearsal (Sackkarre/ #05)
Photographic print, 59x60




Rehearsal (Schiffschaukel/ #03)
Photographic print, 47x51cm (x3)




Rehearsal



by Keh Ng
The modern language experiment



“Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot.” Charlie Chaplin

When viewing the “Rehearsal” pieces, the viewer is reminded of a bygone era of silent films and theatre. Actions that appear funny but somehow tragic are reminiscent of Charlie Chaplin’s quote “Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot.” Chaplin, a master of gesture himself was always aware of the power of the body’s language. That like in any language, nuances are the key that can hold true meaning. The figures we see in the various configurations suggest a formal relationship. It is unclear whether they are performing to entertain or for duty as while the poses are impressive, ridiculous and impossible in equal measure, the expressions of the figures are sometimes pained, non-plussed but most often vacant allowing the viewer to constantly re-assess what exactly these figures are rehearsing.






by Tina Hage

The series Rehearsal was inspired by Sigmer Polke’s piece ‘Menschenbruecke’ and found imagery such as Buster Keaton film stills. The juxtaposition of these reference materials combine to explore ideas of formality, social structures, endurance and art making process.
The ‘rehearsal’ is preparation for an event that will never happen. The poses in the work feel
as though they are mid-action and in the act of forming a gesture rather than existing as a
completed visual form. Although the patterns and physical language of the individual figures
that form the collective act appear strangely natural and familiar, there is an underlying sense
of struggle, tension and alienation. It is as though the figures in the image are aware of the
temporality of this situation.








©Tina Hage 2021